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IMPLICATIONS FOR CURRICULUM PLANNING

"It is the right of every child to be included as a learner within the curriculum, however 
great the degree of disability of learning difficulty". (Barry Carpenter)

The purpose of this document is to provide guiding principles to adapt a sensory approach to the curriculum which is in alignment with the NewZealand Curriculum, including:

  • Vision, principles, values
  • Key Competencies
  • Official languages
  • Learning areas
  • Effective pedagogy
  • Design and review

 

IS DEVISED WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF A SCHOOL CURRICULUM

It provides a clear pathway for the sensory learner within the context of a school’s curriculum framework.  It is not separate from the school’s curriculum but allows access to the curriculum appropriate to student needs. ‘It is the process of personalisation that envelopes the child as an engaged learner (Barry Carpenter). The principles of Universal Design for Learning (UDL) are embedded in the sensory approach.

 

IS CENTRAL TO CURRICULUM PLANNING

As stated in the NZC (page 39), "Curriculum design and practice should begin with the premise that all students can learn and succeed and should recognise that, as all students are individuals, their learning may call for different approaches, different resourcing, and different goals". This aligns to Universal Design for Learning framework.

Student needs should drive a sensory approach to planning to provide quality, motivating and appropriate teaching and learning experiences that will ensure student achievement. "Research suggests that engaged behaviour is the single best predictor of successful learning". (Iovannone et al, 2003). Learning needs to be generalised at every opportunity. To ensure learners have every chance to consolidate their skills, repetitive, isolated learning needs to be avoided. Repetition with variety is the crucial. Learning is always concrete and meaningful; it takes place in context and is processed based.

 

MEETS THE NEEDS OF INDIVIDUAL LEARNERS

 “Curriculum is the main vehicle through which the match of learning experiences to a child’s individual needs will be achieved” (Claire Marvin)

 Learners do not respond, behave or progress in the same way.  When planning a sensory approach to the NZC it is important to accurately identify the individual needs, interests (for example, use the Happiness Audit), abilities and achievements of each learner. Consideration also needs to be given to a student’s preferred learning pathway as a result of  a specific assessment process,  for example, the social interaction and early cognitive pathways identified in Quest for Learning. It is important for all staff to use a consistent approach to relevant assessment methods.

 

RESPECTS AND REFLECTS THE CULTURAL DIVERSITY OF ALL LEARNERS

In planning a sensory approach to the NZC 2007  our vision is for our students, "to create an Aotearoa New Zealand in which Maori and Pakeha recognise each other a full Treaty partners, and in which all cultures are valued for the contributions they bring". (NZC page 8)

 

ĉ
julie king,
Mar 2, 2015, 5:47 PM
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